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Dame Traveler: Behind the Lens: Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch

Today at Dame Traveler, we’re sharing a surreal story! With our new series #DTBehindTheLens, we’re empowering the women behind the lens of the camera. We’re honored and thrilled to introduce Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch in our second spotlight of this series!

Ling’s work is truly eye-catching and her story leaves us feeling inspired — with a bowl of cereal in hand. Today, we’re discussing Ling’s unique story and why she’d like the travel industry to start celebrating female travel photographers.

#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch

Hi Ling! Could you give us a brief introduction to who you are and what you do? 

Hi! I’m from Sydney, Australia. I’m so excited for the chance to share my travel photography with you as part of Dame Traveler’s series. First up, I’m not a fulltime photographer or blogger so I feel incredibly humbled to be featured here.

During the week I work as a lawyer in an environmental and climate change practice. Alongside this though, I think it’s important to give time to the things that you love. I try to create as much as possible and have a huge passion for art and photography; I studied writing, draw portraits, and photograph at every chance I get.

While on a trip around the world with my boyfriend, Jason, I recently started sharing my travel photography in particular. On this trip we also decided to create a blog called Cereal for Lunch for creative travellers—lovers of art, history, culture and dreamy destinations.

#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch

What are the favourite destinations you’ve photographed so far?

Wherever we go, I love to find and photograph surreal scenes. On this theme, some of my favourite photographs have come from the desert across the Chilean and Bolivian Altiplano—flamingos crowd red lagoons, there’s a desert stretch named after Salvador Dali, and if you wait long enough, you can catch a sly fox between volcanic rocks.

Having said that, these destinations are always spectacular, and you can kind of just show up with a camera. On the other hand, I also love street photography because there are so many small scenes to construct from the chaos. Some of the best street scenes have come from Cusco, as well as cities in Cuba, Morocco and Japan.

#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch

What is it that you aim to photograph during your travel experiences?

I think that photography can really compliment travel—it brings a creative aspect to the trip and allows you to document and remember everything along the way. When travelling, the main priority is to see and experience as much of a place as possible; I’m most motivated to explore its art scene, the unique landscapes or architecture, as well as its history, markets and street life.

Hopefully the pictures that I take mirror this travel style, as I want to capture small parts of each destination and the experiences that I’ve had there. I try to post a mix of things and keep a balance between places and portraits. I also tend to photograph scenes that I would like to draw, and usually this means highlighting people, small details and vibrant colours.

#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch

Why do you think it’s important for women photographers to be celebrated in the travel industry?

It’s important for women to be upheld and celebrated in every industry! In the early 1900s, women actually made up quite a large percentage of the photography profession—at a time when it was still quite unusual for women (in the West) to even have a profession. Unfortunately, this declined with the advent of photojournalism, and it remained a male-dominated industry for decades.

It’s easier than ever for everyone to publish their work though, and over time photography has become such an important way to subvert the traditional gaze in the arts, and to share women’s perspectives and experiences, as well. There are so many talented female photographers, and I really support Dame Traveler in making a space to specifically promote their work through this series.

#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch

Are there any changes you would like to see happen in the travel industry?

I support making changes which leave a more positive effect on places, and think I have a personal responsibility to find ways to travel as sustainably as possible. On my last long trip, this has meant:

  • visiting fewer places and spending more time in each one;
  • traveling through each country in a linear way, rather than continuously flying from place to place;
  • supporting local creators, for example by buying directly from individual artists or makers;
  • avoiding travelling in peak times, especially to destinations that are severely impacted by over-tourism;
  • prioritising fair wages over scoring cheap deals; and
  • trying to reduce waste.

Most of these changes have complimented the way that I like to travel. For example, I prefer to explore many different parts of just one country, rather than visiting a few places in many different countries; the ideal situation would be to hire an apartment, cook from local food, and explore one area over as many days as possible. I also really love to meet artists along the way and know that I’m leaving with authentic and ethically produced textiles, jewellery or ceramics.

I’m definitely not trying to say that anyone needs to change the way that they travel specifically—do whatever you want, and most importantly enjoy your trip! But I do think that businesses and consumers need to consider ways to enhance sustainability, particularly if we want certain places to remain viable tourist destinations.

#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch

Through your experiences, what has travel taught you?

Travel has always been quite central as I have a mixed Chinese and Scottish heritage. I think some of the most important things that it can highlight are history, diversity, and continuing traditions. Overall, it weirdly makes the world seem big and small simultaneously.

Have you ever faced any hard circumstances or issues as a female traveler or female travel photographer?

Thankfully not!

What piece of advice would you give to new female travel photographers?

I’ve been so hesitant to answer this because I’m definitely still learning, too. With travel photography in particular, I don’t think there’s any need to travel to a specific destination just because it might seem photogenic. Once you have your eye out, it’s easier to find something to shoot wherever you are—just try to look for interesting scenes and different views of the place that you’re in.

In terms of getting started, the best thing is to experiment until you develop a personal style that you’re happy with. At first this will probably involve spending just as much time on the editing process as actually taking the shots—it can take a while to get familiar with the adjustments that you need to suit different conditions, and to figure out how you like different types of photographs to be framed. Once you have a range of good shots, make your photos more unique by experimenting with different shades and tones.

I now edit and colour my photos in a very specific way, usually by increasing the luminance, bringing down the highlights, and emphasising the red and green tones (all of these changes can be made in pretty much any editing application). I’ll include a before and after comparison so that you can see the difference that the editing process makes.

I don’t think it’s necessary to invest in the most expensive or professional gear straight away either. I’ve been really lucky recently to be able to use an older DSLR to get started, but the lens eventually became quite limiting. It’ll be clear when you need to upgrade from a phone or first camera to better gear once you know what you want out of your shots, and then it’s a probably good idea to connect with other photographers to learn about the best gear to suit the type of photography that you’re interested in.

#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch
#DTBehindTheLens Ling McGregor of Cereal for Lunch

Thank you so much for sharing your story and experience, Ling! Be sure to check out her incredible photographic work.

It’s time to elevate female photographers. Who’s work would you like for us to spotlight next?

Australia Instagrammer's Guides Photography

7 Most Picturesque Spots In Tasmania’s Western Wilds

7 Most Picturesque Spots In Tasmania's Western Wilds

Tasmania’s Western Wilds will leave you dreaming of the expansive, seemingly never-ending, ever-changing landscape for years to come. It’s just part of the experience of seeing Australia’s hidden gem with your very own eyes. Today, I’m sharing seven of the most picturesque spots I discovered along my adventure in the lone, jaw-dropping area of Tasmania.

Cradle Mountain From Dove Lake

Cradle Mountain steals the show when it comes to the most picturesque spots in the Western Wilds… but ensure to build enough time in your schedule to stick around the area in case the mountain is covered in clouds! The Cradle Mountain area gets on average, 242 rainy days a year. February has the least rainy days and August has the most so plan accordingly!

Experience The Gordon River Via Cruise

Take in the equally serene and epic views of the UNESCO World Heritage site of the Gordon River. We loved experiencing the natural beauty from our cruise! Seeing the mountains and landscapes smoothly appear in front of us while on the upper deck was the perfect vantage point for taking in the wildlife of the Gordon River area.

Insider Guide To Exploring Tasmania's West Coast

Queenstown

Learn a little bit about the Western Wilds past by visiting its quaint and quirkiest town – Queenstown. This former mining town has become a must-see stop along your journey, if you ask me! It’s also home to what the locals call – moonscapes – that are truly one of a kind!

Insider Guide To Exploring Tasmania's West Coast

Pumphouse Point

When we began preparing for our trip to Western Tasmania, one of the first beautiful spots we came across and instantly added to our wishlist was the Pumphouse Point Retreat. We’re always seeking out unique experiences for hotel stays… and this place exceeded our expectations. The property offers many photo opportunities, especially the Pumphouse itself which you can also stay in.

7 Most Picturesque Spots In Tasmania's Western Wilds

Nelson Falls

During our drive from the Pumphouse in Lake St. Clair to Queenstown, we made a pit stop at Nelson Falls which was absolutely breathtaking and a nice way to take a break from the 2 hour drive. I couldn’t recommend adding this to your adventures around Tasmania’s Western Wilds more!

7 Most Picturesque Spots In Tasmania's Western Wilds

Mount Owen In Queenstown

Mount Owen’s landscape is one that we could have spent hours and hours taking in. Set on the blue waters of Lake Burbury and conveniently located directly east of Queenstown, Mount Owen is a photographers delight and the perfect destination to add while when road tripping around the Western Wilds.

Tip: To capture this view, book a tour with Roam Wild Tasmania since you can only access the summit of Mount Owen on a guided tour with this local Queenstown tour company.

7 Most Picturesque Spots In Tasmania's Western Wilds

From The Seat Of A Scenic Flight Over The Western Wilds

We took a scenic flight from the Par Avion Cambridge Airport and I truly wish this experience for every traveler visiting Tasmania’s Western Wilds! There’s nothing like seeing the landscape unfolding in front of you from above.

7 Most Picturesque Spots In Tasmania's Western Wilds

Trip sponsored by Discover Tasmania.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. All opinions are my own.

 

Photography

What To Consider When Choosing Your Travel Photography Camera

What To Consider When Choosing Your Travel Photography Camera

A travel photographer truly only needs one thing (besides their one way ticket and maybe their passport, that is!) – an excellent, trusty camera to capture the beauty they experience. Today, I’m sharing some of my top considerations for travel photographers to keep in mind when shopping for their perfect camera and gear.

Consider Your Needs & Style

The first thing all travel photographers should consider is their unique style of shooting and their individual needs to create them. The type of photography you’re aiming to create while guide your decision making. If you’re an advanced photographer aiming to dip their toes into videography, wildlife shoots, or action photography, you’ll have very different needs than a beginner hoping to take some clear and memorable photos for your personal social media or to show friends and family.

A big consideration is your camera’s flexibility and durability as well. Because travel photographers shoot in a multitude of environments, our gear has to be dependable and sturdy no matter the circumstances.

A Look Inside Nastasia's Travel Photography Gear

Weight Is A Big Deal

The nature of a travel photographer’s job is their ability to maneuver through their daily life with ease, and without being tied down. That being said, the weight of your gear is a very big consideration.

If you’re a traveler who truly values the ability to travel light, then you might need to look into the specifics of the camera body’s overall weight. After all, why invest in gear that only stays in your hotel room? I absolutely love my Canon EOS R Mirrorless camera from Adorama because of it’s a lightweight option that doesn’t skimp on image quality. Compared to some of its heavier counterparts, it’s really the perfect choice.

Again, this all comes down to your personal needs and style. If you require a camera for unusual shooting circumstances, or even if you’re happy to carry around more weight and gear for the sake of a specific look for your images, go for it!

A Look Inside Nastasia's Travel Photography Gear

Mirrorless Or DSLR, Cropped Or Full Frame?

The ultimate questions, as most photographers would tell you! DSLR cameras offer travel photographers a wider selection of lenses to choose from, more control over image quality and look in a sturdy body. However, today’s mirrorless cameras are compact, light, offer excellent video image stability. I believe some even rival the quality of their DSLR counterparts!  

Full frame cameras capture a broader dynamic range and are a bit more trusty in darker lighting. Cropped cameras aren’t capable to capture quite as much, but they certainly are more affordable for budget or beginning photographers.

I would highly recommend writing down a list of the type of shooting situations you can see yourself shooting in, as well as adding some inspirational shots you’re inspired by. Do your research and shop around, read reviews and weigh your pros and cons.

What Lens Works Best

A great lens can change everything! This is where the real fun begins, in my opinion. Lenses completely adapt the feel of a captured image. Some things to consider when shopping for lenses are f-stop and focal length. These two elements should not be overlooked.

As far as f-stop goes, the lower the number, the better! These smaller f-stop numbers mean that more light is let into the camera, giving you more flexibility and control in all sorts of lighting circumstances. Light is the ultimate ingredient in all photography, so having a lens that gives you freedom to shoot in all situations key!

There are two types of lens focal length – prime or zoom. For travel photography, I would suggest finding a great zoom lens with versatility. Why? Simply to save room in your baggage and because it can be quite a nuisance to change your lens every time you’re in a new shoot.

I exclusively use two zoom lenses for shooting. One being the Canon RF 24-105mm F4 IS Lens (which came with my camera). I love its simplicity and sharp image quality. And second being my trusty 16-35mm Ultra Wide Angle Zoom Lens. I’m a huge fan of shooting wide to capture a dreamy location in its full glory, and this lens really does the trick! It’s also my go-to when I’m shooting interiors and smaller details while out and about.

What To Consider When Choosing Your Travel Photography Camera

Other Details To Note

Of course, there are many, many other details to consider when shopping for your perfect travel camera. Here are some key items to also think about.

Look into whether or not your camera is able to shoot RAW. This is a file format that gives you the ultimate control in the editing stage. JPEGs are still able to be tweaked and refined, but RAW files give you true mastery while editing. Many cameras are able to shoot both now, which is excellent!

Also ask yourself if you’d like to have an electronic viewfinder, or EVF. This allows you to see the scene in front of you as set by the camera sensor and settings you’ve chosen, not just what is in front of you. This gives you a nice preview of your final product before even pressing your shutter!

Finally, be sure to look into the megapixels your camera sensor has. The higher the megapixel numbers, the more crisp and clear your final images will be in larger prints and formats. If you’re intending on shooting magazine campaigns or large artistic prints, you require a camera with a pretty large megapixel capabilities in your camera sensor!


With these things in mind, I’m sure you have a lot to consider, but remember, investing in your perfect travel camera gear is one of the biggest purchases! Do your research and feel confident in your buy!

This post is sponsored by Adorama, my favorite one-stop shop for all things photography gear.

Interviews Photography

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors

If you’ve missed our big news, we’re changing our perspective! With our new series #DTBehindTheLens, we’re celebrating the women behind the lens of the camera, just as must as those in front of them. Today, we’re honored and excited to share Erin Sulliven Of Erin Outdoors in our first spotlight of this series!

Erin’s work is incredible and her photographic eye leaves us feeling captivated. Today, we’re discussing Erin’s point of view, her story and why she’d like the travel industry to truly start celebrating female travel photographers.

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors
#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors

Hi Erin! Could you give us a brief introduction to who you are and what you do? 

Hi! I am a travel photographer and blogger passionate about the outdoors, wildlife, and learning about cultures around the world.

Before working professionally as a photographer, I was a wilderness guide and adventure trip leader around the world. Leading trips was a rewarding job that allowed me to travel often, and I eventually started a blog to share my experiences.

Since then, I am so grateful to have built a community both online and in the real world of folks who are interested in travel, meaningful conversations, and exploring what lies outside their comfort zones.

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors
#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors
#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors

As we begin our new #DTBehindTheLens series, we’re aiming to spotlight female travel photographers who are not only artists in their field but also showcase more than just a female figure in a photograph. Why do you think it’s important for women photographers to be celebrated?

I think it’s important for any group that has historically not been in the majority to be celebrated. The group of people who have had the most access to photography (for a lot of reasons) is white dudes. Not a bad thing, just the facts.

Personally, as a kid I didn’t really know I could be a professional photographer because I didn’t see women doing what I wanted to do. I think female photographers should be celebrated, and not just women, but all groups who maybe did not have the access or privileges that other demographics had. So that’s women, but more specifically that’s women (and people) of color, gender nonconforming folks, people from marginalized communities, people who didn’t have a platform before due to the situation they were born into or how they identify.

I think it’s important to celebrate female photographers on social media because so often we just see women in front of the camera, as the subject–– and we all know that those images perform well. I still post those images from time to time! But… those images are often not the ones I am most proud of, to be honest.

By celebrating the work of a female photographer, we are celebrating more than her looks or whatever she is doing in the image. We are also celebrating her unique vision and creativity.

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors
#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors
#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors


What change would you like to see happen in the travel industry?

I would like to believe that travel makes us more empathetic human beings. That it would help us listen to each other. That it would make us better communicators.

I want to see people getting out and traveling for good reasons that fuel their souls and inspires them to do well in the world. I’d like to see more conversations happening about culture and the “why” behind travel. I’d like to see stories that dig deeper. I’d like to see the perspectives of the locals amplified. I’d like to see more collaboration from unlikely partners, and more interdisciplinary work. I think we are stronger together.

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors
#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors
#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors


Couldn’t agree more! What is one of the most enthralling experiences you’ve had while photographing the world?

One of my most memorable trips was a personal trip to Namibia with a friend and mentor of mine. It was a last-minute trip, and I didn’t have a particular client I was shooting for.

I was just driven to push myself in my work. Some of my favorite shots and experiences came from that trip. I arrived in the afternoon and immediately drove to the desert.

My first views were from a helicopter above Sossusvlei–– the biggest sand dunes in the world. It was totally stunning and surreal and gave me so much perspective and gratitude. That definitely makes the list.

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors
#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors

Through your experiences, what has travel taught you? What lessons does travel bring to those who experience it?

Oooooof what a big question. I could write a book on this!

I became a trip leader/guide because I had always wanted to travel internationally, but never had the opportunity to. Working with teenagers over the years and facilitating group discussions and teambuilding activities taught me so much, and doing that in other places added even more depth to those learnings.

Travel has always taught me, and continues to teach me, that I don’t know much! I can only bring my experiences with me while being open to receive. Travel has also taught me that people are mostly good. As a kid, I learned to be cynical and skeptical of everyone.

My experiences traveling are constantly unraveling that programming. I am always so touched by the kindness of strangers. Overall, the world will teach you so much as long as you are open to it.

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors

Have you ever faced any hard circumstances or issues as a female travel photographer?

Yeah, a few, BUT I do want to say that as a cis, white woman, I can’t pretend that things have been nearly as difficult as folks from other backgrounds. For me the gender discrimination I have experienced has been in a few ways, some are just annoying and others are more serious.

Early on, it was pretty common for male colleagues to start explaining to me how to use my gear. I still get that sometimes and find it kinda funny.

There have been circumstances when I’ve been offered less money than a male colleague for the same job. I know women in the industry who will email from a male alias so that people won’t try to take advantage of them simply because they are female. Sadly, I can also say I have dealt with sexual harassment in this industry, both online and in person. Some of it was really gross.

I hope women new to the industry will have to deal with this less and less as time goes on and more stories come to light. I am so grateful for those who came before me and those who continue to do badass work and pave the way. I am also grateful to all the men in the industry who have amplified the work of female photographers, and who try to do better. We see you!

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors

What piece of advice would you give to new female travel photographers?

Do good work. The formula is quality + consistency + passion. Quality, because you have to be good. Know what is going on in the photo world, specifically the part of the industry you want to be in. Continually work on your craft. Shoot a lot. Practice even when you don’t feel like it. Consistency, because you need to do that good work consistently for a long time. This shows the world that you’re serious. It also shows you, yourself, that you are serious. And passion because honestly this stuff is HARD. It’s super hard, and you need a fire at your core that can withstand the challenging times. Creativity is hard, entrepreneurship is hard, travel is hard (even though Instagram will not show you that). But it’s also a tremendous, wild, beautiful ride. Have fun.

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors


What is it that you aim to photograph during your travel experiences?

I aim to capture moments that are somehow compelling and contribute to the story of our world. I really enjoy shooting abstract landscapes, wildlife portraits, and images that share a part of someone’s culture. I think those areas are where my skill set is most effective. Hopefully that comes across.

#DTBehindTheLens: Erin Sullivan Of Erin Outdoors

Thank you so much for sharing your story and insight, Erin! Be sure to check out her incredible photographic work.

It’s time to elevate female photographers. Who’s work would you like for us to spotlight next?

Photography

8 Tips For Traveling Abroad With Your Drone

Being obsessed with nature, I adore taking my camera and hitting the road, be it for a road trip in the UK or jetting off to Nordic countries which have stolen my heart, I love travel and being outdoors. I am always intrigued to see places in new seasons, different light and from a new perspective. Whenever I explore new destinations, I always hit satellite maps and pour over the detail of the landscape, so it was only a matter of time before I took to the sky myself and created images of the bird’s eye view myself.

Flying a drone is one of the most liberating experiences, I feel a level of solace as I launch my drone and it climbs in altitude, revealing awe-inspiring scenes the higher and higher it goes! There are lots of drones on the market and I have one that I fly commercially in the UK that is a more substantial but less portable drone and another that I bought as my travel buddy! It is compact, easy to transport and packs the punches when it comes to image quality.

Top Tips For Traveling With Your Drone Abroad

  • Always carry your drone and batteries in your hand luggage – check with your airline about their regulations around the Lipo batteries (check their limits on max Watt-hours and number of batteries) and carry your batteries in Lipo Bags. If one were to malfunction it contains the fire within it!
  • Check what the rules are for flying a drone in the country you are visiting. Every country has a different set of rules on this, so search with terms like ‘Country’ ‘Aviation Authority’ ‘Drone Rules’ and take note of these.
  • Carry a plug convertor so you can charge your drone batteries in your accommodation.
  • If you’re road tripping, get an in car inverter for the cigarette lighter so you can charge your batteries on the move.
  • Use common sense and pre-plan where you’re going to fly based on the countries rules about drone flying.
  • Check the weather forecast and buy a small anemometer so you can measure wind speed to check you’re not flying in conditions beyond what your drone can cope with.
  • Get insurance and check with your insurer that you’re covered in the countries you’re traveling in.
  • Buy spare memory cards, if conditions are on your side and you’re capturing lots of shots and footage, you’ll certainly want to make sure you have enough memory to lay down the memories!

Now that the admin side is done and you’ve got yourself to your destination, conditions are awesome and you’re ready to go, it is time to take to the skies and enjoy every sweet minute of your flight!

I am an advocate of flying drones respectfully, no matter where I am or how epic it would be to fly and shoot some where… if there are signs up that do not permit drone flights, I adhere to them.

I always think that, the more we respect boundaries that are set, the more likely rules are to stay flexible for everyone. We’ve all got a responsibility when we fly to be mindful of others and the nature that we are all enjoying, so I hit it from a place of kindness and community and honoring rules that are laid down.

Once you’ve shot, it is always important if you can to backup your images and footage, the memory cards in most drones are tiny and it would be so devastating to lose a once in a lifetime moment where the stars aligned for the most epic of flights. I travel with my laptop and multiple hard drives, so I can sleep easy and know everything is safe!

So far, I have flown in Iceland, Norway and Sweden which are all away from home destinations for me and extensively along the coastline in Kent in the UK. I have some destinations on my radar this year that I am super excited to be talking my ‘eye in the sky’ to and hope that the weather is on my side to fly and grow that list!

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